Lapsus$ gains access to OKTA and Microsoft

Today (3/22/2022) both OKTA and Microsoft released statements about a threat actor named LAPSUS$ (Microsoft tracks as DEV-0537) who gained access to both organizations. In the last 90 days, this same threat actor has claimed victims including Impresa, NVIDIA, Samsung, Mercado Libre, Vodafone, and most recently Ubisoft.

In the case of Microsoft, the attack appears to be limited to portions of source code related to Microsoft’s Bing, Bing Maps, and Cortana.

“This week, the actor made public claims that they had gained access to Microsoft and exfiltrated portions of source code. No customer code or data was involved in the observed activities. Our investigation has found a single account had been compromised, granting limited access. Our cybersecurity response teams quickly engaged to remediate the compromised account and prevent further activity. Microsoft does not rely on the secrecy of code as a security measure and viewing source code does not lead to elevation of risk. The tactics DEV-0537 used in this intrusion reflect the tactics and techniques discussed in this blog. Our team was already investigating the compromised account based on threat intelligence when the actor publicly disclosed their intrusion. This public disclosure escalated our action allowing our team to intervene and interrupt the actor mid-operation, limiting broader impact.”

I recommend reading Microsoft’s write-up on this incident as it gives a detailed glimpse at the threat actor’s TTPs. For example, the threat actor is paying employees to gain access to victim networks.

However, in the case of OKTA, it appears the attack was more substantial based upon the 8 screen shots that LAPSUS$ made public (here).

The original official statement from OKTA seems to contradict what the hacking group is claiming.

“In January 2022, Okta detected an unsuccessful attempt to compromise the account of a customer support engineer working for a third-party provide”

https://sec.okta.com/articles/2022/03/official-okta-statement-lapsus-claims

The laptop of a support engineer appears to have been compromised. The attacker would have the ability to reset passwords and Multi Factor Authentication for users.

Then Zack Whittaker reported that OKTA reported 366 corporate customers were impacted.

https://techcrunch.com/2022/03/23/okta-breach-sykes-sitel/

Brian Krebs reported that the ringleader of LAPSUS may be a 17-year-old from the city of London, England, who goes by the handle WhiteDoxbin with a net work of $14 million (300 BTC).

https://krebsonsecurity.com/2022/03/a-closer-look-at-the-lapsus-data-extortion-group/

The BBC is quoting that seven people between the ages of 16 to 21 have been arrested.

OKTA Recommendations

1. If you are an OKTA customer, active Incident Response Plans, assume compromise happened between January 16 to 21

2. Collect and retain related logs. Okta System Logs are only available for a limited time (90 days) so you should download those immediately.

3. Hunt for evidence of suspicious password resets or changes to MFA on or around 1/16 to 1/21

4. Rotate Okta privileged passwords.

5. Look at the Okta Admin Console app in particular

legacyEventType eq “app.generic.provision.assign_user_to_app”

the “app.generic.provision” event type

and to identify any users granted access to other apps.

Another event worth checking on is “security.threat.configuration.update” to see any changes to Okta’s behavioral threat detection.

SIEM rules

https://github.com/SigmaHQ/sigma/tree/master/rules/cloud/okta

https://github.com/elastic/detection-rules/tree/main/rules/integrations/okta

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s